niggawitdreadz:

toohot-tohoot:

niggawitdreadz:

How to spoon:

  • Dick hard on the butt
  • Titty in my hand
  • Kiss ya neck
  • Hell yeah
What

HOW TO SPOON

  • DICK HARD ON THE BUTT
  • TITTY IN MY HAND
  • KISS YA NECK
  • H E L L Y E A H
coolchicksfromhistory:

c. 1920 Suffrage FlyerMissouri Historical Society Collections

coolchicksfromhistory:

c. 1920 
Suffrage Flyer
Missouri Historical Society Collections

jonyang22:

Can they have this dance? @i_amsteven #hsm

High school musical 3 came out my senior year-a bunch of us in show choir went to watch it together in theater. I snarked at it the whole way through, made a hysterical (it wasn’t funny) fb post about how there was no way Troy could have made it to the show driving all the way from Albuquerque. I remember Hernandez passing around burned CDs (remember those?) of the soundtrack, I remember everyone blasting the songs in their cars for months afterward.

shmullus:

My dad on income tax: Why should my money be taken from me and used to benefit others? I’ve earned what I’ve got, so why should it be given to people who haven’t worked as hard?

It’s a somewhat understandable sentiment, and one often repeated whenever health care, increased taxes, or social programs are discussed. It’s also wrong.

There’s a persistent myth of the lazy poor. If a person is indigent, it’s due to their bad decisions or a run of bad luck. While white-collar criminals such as Madoff or executives of Enron or AIG are aberrations, the welfare cheats and drug addicts are representative of the poor. The single mother at the poverty line is a victim of her own promiscuity and poor judgment, not deprived of an effective (read: comprehensive) sexual education, easy access to contraceptives, or health services such as Planned Parenthood.

I don’t mean to absolve anyone of personal accountability. There are undoubtedly people who have become rich largely through their own hard work, just as there are those that abuse government assistance or are simply unwilling to work. But these people do not represent a socioeconomic class. Poverty in America is exacerbated and in part, caused by our financial policies.

In general, Americans are hard workers; according to the UN, we work harder and longer hours than any other citizens of a first-world nation. But while our productivity continues to increase, our earnings fail to keep pace: imageAnd according to information from the census bureau, for the past forty years the top fifth earners in America have seen their income grow considerably more than the lowest fifth. I’m terrible at making charts, but here’s an effort at making numbers easier to understand: image

Not only do the richest Americans gain much more in prosperity, the poorest among us are also the hardest hit by economic disaster. However, income inequality means little unless income mobility is taken into account. Economic mobility is a measure of how easily a family can lose or acquire wealth. Extremely high mobility would mean financial success is more or less random, while a nation with very low economic mobility such as Brazil has a class system where the impoverished have little to no hope for a better life. An ideal society rewards hard work, not the circumstances of birth; the American dream is based on this principle of meritocracy. But for decades, it has become progressively harder for Americans to climb out of poverty. Reports from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston reveal that economic mobility in the United States has been decreasing since the seventies and rapidly from the nineties onward. Nevertheless, Republicans continue to insist on extended tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations such as GE that make billions of dollars in profit yet somehow don’t need to pay taxes. image
Clearly the solution is to cut government programs such as public radio and Planned Parenthood, and do away with unnecessary agencies such as the Department of Education entirely (all of which are actual cuts proposed by buttass insane right-wing congresspeople). 

If we accept that the poor are no less deserving of basic things such as access to preventative health services, it is the responsibility of the haves to contribute to the well-being of the have-nots. image
The fact that someone objects to paying slightly more so that another in need may be healthy is morally abhorrent and reprehensible. It demonstrates an ignorance of privilege and a lack of compassion. The notion that the poor don’t deserve the same fundamental benefits as those who can afford them is understandable. Understandable, but ultimately wrong.

15x20:

more street style here ♡

nprmusic:

Watch the video for “Mistakes Of My Youth” from The Cautionary Tales Of Mark Oliver Everett, a new album of deeply personal music from Eels.

You can watch that and more video on All Songs TV

fashion-runways:

Tony Ward RTW Fall/Winter 2013-2014

fashion-runways:

Tony Ward RTW Fall/Winter 2013-2014

i was havin a great time until i remembered that i was ugly

fartgallery:

that person you just called a nerd? they are a giant nerd. you made a good call on that one

ryanjjohn:

Every day I struggle between “I wanna look good naked” and “treat yo self.”

medievalpoc:

cultureunseen:

http://society6.com/artist/replaceface

You know what’s funny? I think a lot of people view these images as interesting because they’re “unrealistic” or specifically because they feature men of color, anachronistic. I do like them, but I just wanted to add something….

For each of these implied anachronisms, there is a real painting of a real Man of Color from European Art History. (The text for each image is a link to learn more!)

A French Gentleman, c. 1800

image

Toussaint L’Ouverture, c. 1790s

image

Alexander Pushkin, 1899

image

Portrait of Général Thomas Alexandre Dumas (father of author Alexandre Dumas)

image

Raden Syarif Bustaman Saleh, Javanese Aristocrat and Artist in the Netherlands, 1840

image

Olaudah Equiano, c. 1840s

image

Abram Petrovich Gannibal, c. 1690s

image

Chevalier de Saint-Georges, c. 1780s

image

Ira Aldridge, Victorian Actor, c. 1840

image

János Bihari, Composer, c. 1840

image

The Postillion of Erddig House, 1730

image

Jack Black of Ystumllyn, Wales, 1754

image

A Young Eastern European Man c. 1750:

image

P.S. my favorite from the OP is will.i.am!!!